Healthy Child Programme

Every Child Matters (ECM)/Healthy Child Programme: from 5-19 years (HCP)

Department of Education/Department of Health/Department for Children, Schools & Families

The Healthy Child Programme’s good practice guidance is designed to help a range of services provide “a coherent, holistic approach to children’s and young people’s health and wellbeing.” (p8) “The 5–19 HCP recognises the key role of both health and non-health professionals in promoting children’s and young people’s wellbeing and is therefore aimed at the full range of practitioners in children’s services.” (p13)

“The best possible health underpins a child’s or young person’s ability to flourish, stay safe and achieve as they grow up. Health is crucially linked with education – for example, a child who does not master the basics of reading and numeracy may experience not only education but health problems in the future. On the other hand, good health and emotional wellbeing are associated with improved attendance and attainment at school, which in turn lead to improved employment opportunities. In addition, children who thrive at school are better placed to act on information about good health. The foundations of the HCP lie in the five Every Child Matters (HM Government, 2004) outcomes that children and young people identified as fundamental to their lives: be healthy; stay safe; enjoy and achieve; make a positive contribution; and achieve economic wellbeing.” (p10)

 “Schools have an important role to play in promoting healthy lifestyles and, as appropriate, providing extra support to at-risk children. This is underpinned by schools’ statutory duty to promote the wellbeing of their pupils, to provide healthy school food and their statutory provision of PE and – subject to consultation – Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education [including sex and relationships education – see Layston’s PSHRE policy].” (p14)

Improving social and emotional learning is also important to well-being and improved outcomes in school and later life. “Social and emotional learning refers to the process through which children learn to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions. “ (p 4 EEF, Improving Social and Emotional Learning in Primary Schools)

Layston’s contribution to supporting the HCP through ECM:

ECM Curriculum Website
Be healthy -Regular active outdoor learning sessions in a rural setting -Forest School sessions for every year group x1 week -PE sessions x2 week -Delivery of PSHRE curriculum including the statutory Sex & Relationships Education and Health Education – see policy -Food tech and links to ‘Food for Life’ in cookery -Teaching & promotion of ‘5 Ways to Wellbeing’ – Mental Health Lead & MH First Aider -All staff Step On trained in therapeutic responses to behaviour -Healthy Schools status – healthy snacks & school dinners, healthy packed lunches without sweets, outdoor activity -Supporting transition including pre-school background using the ‘Smooth transitions toolkit’ and maintaining close links with our feeder schools -Targeted support and adaptations for pupils with additional medical needs (e.g. asthma, diabetes, allergies…)   Home Learning Zone includes PE & PSHRE links and activities Positive Mental Health & Wellbeing section Sports Premium section   See also: Statutory information – Policies –Anti-bullying, Behaviour, Bereavement, Mental Health & Wellbeing, Packed Lunch, PE, PSHRE
Stay safe -Safeguarding procedures, DSLs & early intervention through Families First Assessment (links to Rib Valley Family Support Worker) -Caretaker daily site walks -Covid risk assessment -Delivery of PSHRE curriculum including road safety and what to do in an emergency, Protective Behaviours and visits from PCSOs -eSafety taught across school -Staff PREVENT training -Supporting transition including pre-school background -Targeted support and adaptations for pupils with additional medical needs (e.g. asthma, diabetes, allergies…) -Reflection areas in each classroom and outside   Home Learning Zone includes link to www.internetmatters.org Nurture section   See also: Statutory information – Policies – Anti-bullying, Behaviour, Child Protection, Health & Safety, Mental Health & Wellbeing, On-line Safety, PSHRE, Supporting Pupils with Medical Conditions, Safer Recruitment, Remote Learning & Volunteers
Enjoy & achieve -Parent Partnership & ‘open door’ culture -Curriculum and development of learning powers (resilience, reciprocity, reflectiveness and resourcefulness) -Creative, broad & balanced curriculum -Reward systems -Clubs and extra-curricular activities such as school play & interschool sports -Early intervention of SEND, support and inclusion -PPG -Supporting transition including pre-school background -Wrap around care provided through Buntings breakfast, after school and holiday club -School trips and visits/visitors   Home Learning Zone Parental Engagement section SEND section   See also: Statutory information – Policies – Accessibility Plan, Anti-bullying, Assessment, Marking & Presentation, Attendance, Behaviour, PSHRE, Remote Learning, SEND, Supporting Pupils with Medical Conditions, Teaching & Learning, Volunteers
Make a positive contribution -Christian values and culture of nurture & forgiveness -Charity work & fundraising – links to Layston Grove,  St Peter’s church -Pupil voice: Eco-Warriors, Worship Group, Talk Circles   Positive Mental Health & Wellbeing section Parental Engagement section   See also: Statutory information – Policies – Anti-bullying, Behaviour, Mental Health & Wellbeing, PSHRE, RE  
Achieve economic wellbeing -Curriculum and development of learning powers (resilience, reciprocity, reflectiveness and resourcefulness) -Creative, broad & balanced curriculum -Aspirational curriculum Positive Mental Health & Wellbeing section Parental Engagement section   See also: Statutory information – Policies – Attendance, Behaviour, PSHRE, Teaching & Learning